This week’s highlights from other photo blogs

I follow somewhere around 80 photo-related blogs, and for a long time now I’ve been wanting to cull the best bits from each and collect them in one spot, sort of like a weekly snapshot of the photoblogosphere. Well, today’s the day to finally kick this thing off. Here’s “This week’s highlights from other photo blogs.” Feel free to tell me about any posts that you think should have made the cut, via kristina@stocklandmartel.com or the comments.

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At The New York TimesLens blog, Kerri MacDonald talked about Nancy LeVine‘s poignant series on aging canines

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A Photo Editor interviewed Vincent Laforet about the future of photography:

APE: …Eventually, there’s going to be no shutter to press.

VL: Precisely. The cameras can now be recording all the time.

APE: So doesn’t that just transfer the job of capturing the decisive moment to editing the decisive moment?

VL: Editing is going to become one of the most important, sought after skill sets in the next five to 10 years. I think we’re going to see such an incredible amount of data coming in, to the likes of which we’ve never seen before that editors are going to become one of the most important job positions out there.

APE: So there will be a need for a photographer to pair up with an editor?

VL: I don’t see how a photographer/videographer can do all this on their own. They would never sleep.

(Read more: “Vincent Laforet – The Future Of Photography Is Convergence”).

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We Can Shoot Too rightly posted the following excerpt from art critic Jerry Saltz‘s Venice Biennale review as “Quote of the Week”:

“I went to Venice, and I came back worried. Every two years, the central attraction of the Biennale is a kind of State of the Art World show. This year’s, called “Illuminations,” has its share of high points and ­artistic intensity. (Frances Stark’s animated video of her online masturbatory tryst with a younger man hooked me; Christian Marclay’s The Clock, which captivated New York earlier this year, rightly won the Gold Lion Prize for Best ­Artist.) Yet many times over—too many times for comfort—I saw the same thing, a highly recognizable generic ­institutional style whose manifestations are by now extremely familiar. Neo-Structuralist film with overlapping geometric colors, photographs about photographs, projectors screening loops of grainy black-and-white archival footage, abstraction that’s supposed to be referencing other abstraction—it was all there, all straight out of the seventies, all dead in the ­water. It’s work stuck in a cul-de-sac of aesthetic regress, where everyone is deconstructing the same elements.”

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Resource magazine took note of a new photography magazine from India called PIX


Click image to access PIX's site.

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ReutersPhotographers blog posted a beautiful story on a Ping-Pong therapy program in L.A. for people suffering from dementia and Alzheimer’s. Among the benefits, apparently, are relieving depression…

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Also at A Photo Editor, Bill Cramer, the CEO of Wonderful Machine, broke down the details of negotiating a contract for a Fast Company assignment. Lots of good info here for photogs who find the process vexing and unsettling. An excerpt…

“Photographers should be aware that there are some unscrupulous clients out there who will intentionally withhold sending a contract until after a shoot, thinking that the photographer will have diminished leverage to negotiate at that point. The fact is that both parties are equally disadvantaged in those cases. After all, the client can’t publish the pictures without the photographer’s permission and the photographer won’t get paid until they have reached an agreement with the client.”

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Wired‘s Raw File showcased Wolfram Hahn‘s project “Into the Light,” for which Hahn scouted “profile portraits of people in his home city of Berlin. When he found a worthy self-portrait, he sent a message inquiring about why the user took the photo. Then, if the user was game, Hahn schlepped his a tripod-mounted Hasselblad over to the subject’s apartment and re-enacted the original picture-taking scene.”


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And Pictory Blog tipped us off to Linka Odom‘s “Coming Home” series with this telling photo of Odom’s mom. “If only an image could describe a 33 year marriage gone sour halfway through. Perhaps this one does.”

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2 Comments

  1. Posted 06/24/2011 at 10:23 am | Permalink

    Great to see the web curated by a discerning eye.
    This would be a cool thing to receive in a weekly email.
    Thanks, Kristina!


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