Jim Fiscus/Chris Bilheimer exhibition opens in Athens on Friday

Award-winning photographer Jim Fiscus, creator of the digital novella “The Unfortunate Moment of Misunderstanding,” has collaborated with Grammy-nominated graphic designer Chris Bilheimer on an unusual series that combines large-scale photography with other media. The project, titled “A Year on the Hill,” will premiere this Friday at the University of Georgia’s Lamar School of Art, in Athens. Here’s a look at one of the images:

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"Moth," 45.5 x 44 inches, by Jim Fiscus and Chris Bilheimer. From the series "A Year on the Hill."

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From the press release:

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The collaborative exhibition, titled “A Year on the Hill,” includes ten single images and three triptychs, measuring from 3×4 to 8×8 feet. All photographs were taken with a view camera in multiple frames, which made possible the production of large size images. Some of the films used are no longer manufactured. … All the work on this project took place on The Hill in Athens, Georgia between November of 2009 and the fall of 2010. The images in this exhibition have never been shown before.

The collaboration between Fiscus, an award-winning advertising and editorial photographer whose clients include Levis, Guinness, HBO, Nike, Coca-Cola and ESPN, and Bilheimer, a Grammy-nominated graphic artist who has designed packaging for R.E.M, Green Day and Nirvana among many other major-label music acts, is the result of their personal friendship and proximity in Athens. “We have both wanted to work together for many years, and it all finally came together with this project,” Fiscus said.

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"Catfish," 96 x 56 inches, by Jim Fiscus and Chris Bilheimer. From the series "A Year on the Hill."

"Grasshopper," 58 x 70 inches, by Jim Fiscus and Chris Bilheimer. From the series "A Year on the Hill."

"Raccoon," 58 x 75 inches, by Jim Fiscus and Chris Bilheimer. From the series "A Year on the Hill."

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“This show highlights a significant development in contemporary photography, showing that artists are deliberately merging the distinctions between fine arts projects and commissioned projects,” said Asen Kirin, associate professor of art history in the art school who organized the exhibition. “In photography, the primary image, whether a negative or digital file, can be reproduced endlessly. But this collaboration turns that around in that it emphasizes the unique finishes on the actual prints.”

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For further details, click here.

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