Highlights from other photo blogs

The summer’s been a bit slow, so I haven’t done one of these roundups in a while. Here’s a look at some highlights from other photo blogs over the last couple of weeks:

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Sean O’Hagan of The Guardian penned a thought-provoking column on rock stars and photography asserting that “photography has often spoken louder than words when it comes to enshrining a performer in the public eye.” His piece was inspired by the exhibition “20th Century Icons” at Proud Galleries in the Chelsea section of London. “The show,” O’Hagan writes, “provides ample illustration of photography’s power to help construct, perpetuate – and occasionally puncture – the image of the rock star as demigod.” He homes in on three examples:

“Terry O’Neill’s arresting image of an imperious Frank Sinatra and his bodyguards strolling along a boardwalk in Miami in 1968; Elliott Landy’s portrait of a bucolic Bob Dylan at home in Woodstock in 1969; Ethan Russell’s picture of Keith Richards posing beside an airport customs sign proclaiming a drug-free America in 1972. In their separate ways, each photo raises questions about fame: about the presence that certain performers have, even offstage, and their willingness to play up to, or subvert, their own status.”

Link: http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2011/aug/23/20th-century-icons-photography-rock

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Rob Haggart at A Photo Editor wondered, “Is Lürzer’s Archive Worth It?”  “My opinion, based on just listening to people, not actual experience, is that none of this is worth it unless it’s part of an actual campaign to reach potential clients,” he wrote. “A general rule that a client must see your work in around 5 different places before they will place you on the ‘to hire someday’ list seems smart. That means if your work appears in Archive it should also hit their desk in a mailer and their email box then possibly on a blog or magazine they check out and finally at a portfolio showing.”

Link: http://www.aphotoeditor.com/2011/08/17/is-lurzers-archive-worth-it/

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John Midgley (center) on a 2009 shoot for his Brooklyn Circus project.

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John Midgley is looking rather prescient, with his decision two years ago to begin a photo project on the Brooklyn Circus, a clothing boutique in Boerum Hill that has become a trendsetter in “black dandyism,” as The New York Times dubbed it in yet another feature to namecheck the BKc and its dapper founder, Ouigi Theodore.

Link: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/18/fashion/pushing-the-boundaries-of-black-style.html?_r=1&hpw

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Intrigued by a panel discussion titled “Social Getworking,” sponsored by the San Francisco branch of the American Photographic Artists (APA), Alison McCreery of the Photographers on Photography Blog arranged a follow-up interview/discussion among the panelists: APA board member Josh Bobb, online branching coach Miki Johnson, photographer/blogger Timothy Archibald, and Heather Elder of Heather Elder Represents, who invited Jill Hundenski, an art producer at TeamOne, to join in. The first half of the conversation was devoted to asking Hudenski about how she sources photographers and what she looks for. Here’s one of her answers:

For the most part, consistency in the work is pretty big. We understand a photographer can shoot a lot of different things and the quality can be great. We like to go to a specific photographer for a specific project or style. We like to think “that’s the guy who shoots like this.” If the work is all over the board, it’s more work on our end to narrow down some of their images to sell to our client. So consistency is really big.

I actually also like to look at their personal or fine art work. We look at so much commercial work that we get it. We like to see personal or fine art work to see the creativity of the photographer. We understand they are a really good shooter, but what are they thinking? Or what are they doing on the side? What personal project are they working on? It shows us who they are as a person and some of their personality.

Most importantly is that their site is easy to navigate. If there’s too much flash and I can’t get an idea of what the style is, it becomes frustrating and makes me want to move on. The simpler that it is, the better. This is very important. The point is to get the work across and for us to see it as fast as possible.

Link: http://blog.apasf.com/?p=3099

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From the book "To the Moon," published in 1969 by Time-Life..

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The WhiteLoupe Photography Blog featured photos from To the Moon, a 1969 Time-Life publication on NASA’s Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo projects. The images, which WhiteLoupe picked up from the blog Sci-Fi-O-Rama, have an innocence to them. They’re not at all heroic, which if you ask me makes them all the more appealing.

Link: http://thewhiteloupe.com/post/To-The-Moon

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