Kwaku Alston photographs Oprah Winfrey and actress/singer Renée Elise Goldsberry for the cover of Essence magazine’s April issue

On April 22, HBO will air its movie adaptation of the bestselling book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, “the true story of Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman whose cervical cancer cells were used without her consent to create the first immortal human cell line, HeLa, in 1951,” as People magazine notes. The movie stars Oprah Winfrey in the title role. Kwaku Alston photographed Winfrey and costar Renée Elise Goldsberry (the film also features Rose Byrne, Courtney B. Vance, and Reg E. Cathey) for the cover of Essence‘s April issue. Read an excerpt of the story here.

 

Oprah Winfrey and Renée Elise Goldsberry costar in the HBO movie “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.” Photo by Kwaku Alston for Essence, April 2017 issue.

Photo by Kwaku Alston for Essence.

Photo by Kwaku Alston for Essence.

Click to watch a behind-the-scenes video of the shoot.

Nadav Kander photographs “Peaky Blinders” star Cillian Murphy for The Observer

Photo by Nadav Kander for the Observer.

Photo by Nadav Kander for the Observer.

Photo by Nadav Kander for the Observer.

 

Read the article here.

 

Presenting “Cowboys,” a new personal project by Miller Mobley

Photo by Miller Mobley, from his series “Cowboys.”

Photo by Miller Mobley, from his series “Cowboys.”

Photo by Miller Mobley, from his series “Cowboys.”

Photo by Miller Mobley, from his series “Cowboys.”

Photo by Miller Mobley, from his series “Cowboys.”

Photo by Miller Mobley, from his series “Cowboys.”

Photo by Miller Mobley, from his series “Cowboys.”

Melanie Acevedo’s “Another 52 Weeks”: tween

Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

 

Follow “Another 52 Weeks”: 52weeks.melanieacevedo.com

Lauren Greenfield’s “Generation Wealth,” a visual history of the growing obsession with wealth, to open April 8 at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles

 

Award-winning photographer and director Lauren Greenfield, whom Time magazine has called “one of the most acclaimed chroniclers of youth culture and the affluent,” is the subject of a new monograph published by Phaidon and a major exhibition at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles that runs April 8 to August 13.

“Generation Wealth,” which spans two and a half decades of Lauren’s work, “examines the influence of affluence over the last 25 years, illustrating the globalization of materialism, celebrity culture and social status. This timely, thought-provoking collection explores how ‘keeping up with the Joneses’ has become Keeping Up With the Kardashians, magnifying the aspirational gap between what we want and what we can afford. The exhibit is not about the rich, but the pervasive desire for more,” notes the Annenberg in the promotional material for the show.

“There’s no hiding from the eye of a truly great photographer. Lauren Greenfield has given us nothing short of an x-ray of our ambitions and ideals. In all of contemporary photography, no one is better at exploring the tension between what we covet and who we really are—between the mad dash for affluence and the price we pay for that pursuit,” Wallis Annenberg, Chairman of the Board, President and CEO of the Annenberg Foundation, says in the press release for the exhibition. “To me, Lauren Greenfield is so much more than a groundbreaking artist; she’s a sociologist, a storyteller, an ironist and a keen humorist. This is a wonderful, timely, thought-provoking body of work and, now more than ever, it’s one we all need to see.”

“I think the power of capitalism, and exploiting addiction in general, is looking for insecurities and weaknesses,” Lauren told The Huffington Post, which featured a selection of images from the show. “Everybody that has insecurities becomes a very good consumer. The way marketing works is, if you buy this thing, it will fix what you feel is missing.” Smithsonian magazine also interviewed her about her exhibit and book. “If you ask kids today what they want to be when they grow up,” she noted, “most of them say, ‘Rich and famous.’”

Lauren will be speaking about her work on April 30 in Chicago as part of the Chicago Humanities Festival. Tickets are only $15 for nonmembers. More info here.

For a preview of the book Generation Wealth, and to preorder a copy, go here.

And for more information about the exhibition at the Annenberg, click here.

 

Nigel Cox shoots the new Honda C-RV for the cover of Consumer Reports’ April issue

Photo by Nigel Cox for Consumer Reports, April 2017 issue.

Photo by Nigel Cox for Consumer Reports.

Jeff Lipsky shoots new DSW campaign

Photo by Jeff Lipsky for DSW.

Photo by Jeff Lipsky for DSW.

Photo by Jeff Lipsky for DSW.

Photo by Jeff Lipsky for DSW.

Photo by Jeff Lipsky for DSW.

Photo by Jeff Lipsky for DSW.

Photo by Jeff Lipsky for DSW.

Miller Mobley shoots publicity images for the TV Land’s series “Heathers,” “Teachers,” and “Throwing Shade”

“Heathers” is TV Land’s adaptation of the 1988 Winona Ryder cult classic. Photo by Miller Mobley for TV Land.

Photo by Miller Mobley for TV Land.

Photo by Miller Mobley for TV Land.

The comedy “Teachers” is now in its second season. Photo by Miller Mobley for TV Land.

Photo by Miller Mobley for TV Land.

Photo by Miller Mobley for TV Land.

Photo by Miller Mobley for TV Land.

“Throwing Shade” is based on a campy comic podcast, which later moved to Funny or Die, hosted by Bryan Safi and Erin Gibson. Photo by Miller Mobley for TV Land.

Photo by Miller Mobley for TV Land.

Chico’s commissions Melanie Acevedo for print and motion campaign featuring real-life friends

Chico’s is putting its own twist on the popular boyfriend jean trend by launching its Girlfriend Jean Collection. Fittingly, the campaign promoting it features real-life pals, including commercials in which they talk about their friendship and what it means to them. Chico’s commissioned Melanie Acevedo—whose fresh, optimistic visual style appeals to a wide audience—for both the print and motion components. The director of photography was Santiago Gonzalez.

 

Photos by Melanie Acevedo for Chico’s.

Photos by Melanie Acevedo for Chico’s.

 

 

Art Streiber on shooting/directing the print and motion campaign for the new Pop comedy “Nightcap”

Nightcap is the brainchild of comedian Ali Wentworth, who plays the executive producer of a fictitious late-night talk show hosted by a guy named Jimmy. The entire show takes place in the hallways and offices backstage at the show, and we never see Jimmy (but that’s his fake desk)!” explains Art Streiber, who shot the print campaign and directed spots for the new Pop series.

“The brilliant key art concept from the creatives at Pop TV, Rich Browd and Anthony Annandono, was to place Ali and her crew under the host’s desk, hiding in terror as Jimmy does his monologue. The problem? How to get nine adults comfortably under a desk and then light it to make it look like the light was motivated from the stage lights hitting the host. The answer? Set designer Rob Strauss and I put the fake desk on a U-shaped riser that allowed the talent to squeeze in underneath it. Rob rounded the edges of the desk legs to give the illusion that they were curving in on the talent.”

 

Production still courtesy Art Streiber Photography.

Production still courtesy Art Streiber Photography.

“Then we went toppy-ish with two Elinchrom octobanks side by side and a silver Profoto beauty dish in the center and a series of gridded 7-inch reflectors, backed off high and aimed at the camera to emulate the stage lights. Then we shot the host under the same lighting conditions on his own riser so that he’d end up on the same floor plain as the desk! And major props to Brooke Ludi, who magnificently produced a shoot in another city with nine talent, stills, and motion and…a llama! And more props to Angie Hayes at the Happy Pixel Project, who brilliantly put the whole thing together in post.”

 

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

Photo by Art Streiber for Pop.

 

 

 

 

 

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