At the Spring Hackathon in New York this month, college students competed in a high-pressure 24-hour coding spree. Doug Menuez, who was there to document the next generation of fearless geniuses, takes us behind the scenes

What’s the tech counterpart to marathons and triathlons? Hackathons. And earlier this month, New York University was host to a big one organized by hackNY, a nonprofit organization whose stated aim is “to federate the next generation of hackers for the New York innovation community.”

The Spring Hackathon—there’s also one in the fall—drew hundreds of students from universities around the country to “participate in collaborative and creative coding challenges in a 24-hour coding sprint.”

Doug Menuez, whose interest in technological innovation can be traced back to the years he spent documenting the digital revolution in Silicon Valley (as seen in his recent monograph Fearless Genius), documented the intense, exhausting, exhilarating day of hacking.

“I was there as a guest of HackNY and their partner Major League Hacking to shoot as part of my continuing Fearless Genius project (fearlessgenius.org), which documented the early days of Silicon Valley and now looks at where we are today and heading next with new technology,” says Doug.

“The kids broke into teams and hacked all day Saturday and through the night on their ideas to be ready to present to the judges on Sunday. The prizes are awarded based on the ‘awesomeness’ of the idea and execution of the code. The students got 90 seconds to present their hacks.”

It was a high-pressure situation, but also one that was full of possibility.

“I was personally inspired by the energy and wide-open creative mindset of these extremely diverse kids,” says Doug. “These are the next generation of innovators and entrepreneurs that will shape our future—attention must be paid.”

He continues, “In New York startup culture, I see a similar passion and idealism that infused Silicon Valley in the early days. They wanted to build tools to improve our lives. Money was secondary, at first. They had purpose. At this hackathon, the top prize was for the best idea to benefit society—very cool. So I’m hopeful these kids might help build a better future, and maybe even save the planet.”

See more of Doug’s Spring Hackathon photos here.

 

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Melanie Acevedo’s “Another 52 Weeks”: Where’s Rocky?

Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

 

Follow “Another 52 Weeks”: 52weeks.melanieacevedo.com

Nadav Kander shoots campaign for Mercedes-Benz

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Introducing set designer and prop master Hayley Callander

Photos by (clockwise from top) Danny Cohen, Neil Bailey, and Stuart Crossett.

 

Stockland Martel is pleased to announce that set designer and prop master Hayley Callander has joined our roster. Hayley is known for her innovative conceptual design, technical skills, and ability to cleverly problem solve in even the most challenging of circumstances. Her extensive experience includes set and costume design, prop building, fashion shows, editorials, and music videos, and her clients range from Coca-Cola and Cadbury, to Mazda and Mini Cooper, to L’Oreal, Heineken, and Nokia.

 

Photos by (top row) Scott Newett and (bottom) Hugh Peachy.

 

Influenced by cinema and possessing a quick wit, Hayley designs highly charged compositions, while her stylized approach to set and wardrobe create a heightened, saturated, dreamlike quality. She prefers manual processes and often experiments with special effects to design and create props, costumes, and sets. She once produced a jacket made entirely of slices of toasted bread for a beer ad, made real people look like life-size plastic models for a transportation campaign, and created a snow-globe helmet—complete with quaint landscape—for a personal project.

 

Photos by (top row) Andreas Bommert and (bottom) Scott Newett.

 

“I enjoy the complex narrative of visual communication and the creative process of sewing concepts together. The more insane the idea, the better, in my book,” says Hayley, whose many inspirations range from pop-up books, Tokyo in spring, Dali’s mustache, and Yves Klein’s blue to Warhol‘s Polaroids, Wes Anderson’s palette, “Gregory Crewdson‘s everything,” anthropomorphic memes, La Nouvelle Vague, “New Wave of New Wave,” Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Holy Mountain, Velázquez’s Las Meninas, cats in pajamas, and “the cat’s pajamas!”

 

Photos by (from left) Hugh Peachey and Alex Aslangul.

 

View Hayley’s portfolio at stocklandmartel.com/callander.

 

Follow her on Instagram at @hayleycallander.

 

 

For a peek at Hayley’s creative process, click here or on the image below.

 

Brinson+Banks photograph Selena Gomez and her mother, Mandy Teefey, with playwright Brian Yorkey for the New York Times’ feature on their Netflix drama “13 Reasons Why”

Most people know Selena Gomez as a pop singer and actress, but she’s recently added a new credit to her name: executive producer. Gomez and her mother, Mandy Teefey, co-executive produced Netflix‘s much-buzzed-about teen drama 13 Reasons Why, based on the book by Jay Asher.

“The best-selling young adult novel tells the story of Hannah Baker, a high school girl who kills herself, leaving behind cassette tapes detailing the 13 people she blames for driving her to suicide,” says the New York Times, which interviewed Gomez, Teefey, and playwright Brian Yorkey, who adapted the book for the screen.

Brinson+Banks photographed the trio at the London West Hollywood for the story. “Selena Gomez is every bit as sweet as you’d imagine,” says David Walter Banks. “We got to sit through her interview about the series, which hits on some heavy issues for adolescents. It was fascinating to see another side of Selena.”

Read the story here.

 

Selena Gomez at the London West Hollywood. Photo by Brinson+Banks for The New York Times.

Gomez with her mother, Mandy Teefey, co-executive producer of “13 Reasons Why,” with playwright Brian Yorkey, who adapted the book for TV. Photo by Brinson+Banks for The New York Times.

Photo by Brinson+Banks for The New York Times.

Photo by Brinson+Banks for The New York Times.

Sign up for Art Streiber’s one-day workshop at the Palm Springs Photo Festival

At this year’s Palm Springs Photo Festival, Art Streiber will be leading a one-day workshop on “Managing a Career in Editorial Photography & Beyond,” and he’ll be covering a lot of ground in great detail and with his signature sense of humor.

He’s organized his workshop around three main areas: handling the shoot (preproduction, production, postproduction); managing your business (put systems in place, handle your finances, take advantage of downtime); and effective marketing (the Web, your portfolio, and  promotional pieces).

Tuition for the workshop, which is scheduled for Monday, May 8, from 9 AM to 4 PM, is $395. Click here for more details and to register.

 

 

Among the questions Art will be answering:

• How do I get hired to shoot for a national monthly or weekly?

• What’s the difference between a design director and a creative director?

• Should I sign the magazine’s contract?

• What are editorial budgets like?

• How do I create and negotiate a budget?

• How much money should I have in the bank in order to float my shoots?

• Should I own my own gear?  How much?

• Can I say no to an assignment?

• How much homework should I do?

• Is scouting the location important?

• How early should I get to the shoot?

• How many different setups should I shoot?

• How hard should I edit my imagery?

• Is custom printing or retouching important?

• How does syndication work?

• How do I avoid being pigeonholed as just one kind of shooter?

• How do I shoot new work if I’m not getting assigned to shoot new work?

• Should I put tearsheets on my website?

• How should my portfolio differ from my website?

• When is the best time of year to go to New York and show my work?

• Should I cold call photo editors?

• Do I need a rep?

• Should I send printed promo pieces or electronic promo pieces?

• How do I make the leap from editorial to commercial work?

Matthias Clamer shoots publicity images for season three of the FX hit series “Fargo”

Ewan McGregor as Ray Stussy. “Balding and pot-bellied, Ray is the kind of guy who peaked in high school. Now a parole officer, he has a huge chip on his shoulder about the hand he’s been dealt,” writes Deadline.com. Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Mary Elizabeth Winstead as Nikki Swango, “a crafty and alluring recent parolee with a passion for competitive bridge playing,” writes Variety. “Nikki is a woman with a plan, focused on always being at least one move ahead of her opponents.” Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

David Thewlis as V.M. Vargas, “a mysterious loner and true capitalist who delivers Emmit Stussy (Ewan McGregor), the Parking Lot King of Minnesota, the bad news that he has just become partners with his employers, whose business interests lay outside the law,” writes The Hollywood Reporter. Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Ewan McGregor as Emmit Stussy, “the Parking Lot King of Minnesota. A handsome, self-made real estate mogul and family man, he sees himself as an American success story,” writes Deadline.com. Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Carrie Coon as police chief Gloria Burgle. Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Michael Stuhlbarg as Sy Feltz, “Emmit’s right-hand man and consigliere,” says Deadline.com. Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Shea Whigham as police chief Moe Dammick. Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Olive Sondoval as police officer Winnie Lopez. “Blessed with the gift of gab, Winnie is not shy about sharing her feelings on everything from family planning to being a female on the force,” writes Deadline.com. Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

Photo by Matthias Clamer for FX.

 

See Matthias’ publicity images for season one and the key art and publicity images for season two.

Brinson+Banks photograph actor Noel Braham

“We met Noel on the CBS lot on a rare rainy LA day,” say Brinson+Banks, who photographed Braham for GSU Magazine. “He was dressed to the nines in this killer suit and yet insisted on getting rained on so he could hold the umbrella and cover others. Noel is a Southern gentleman through and through—which we can spot and appreciate because we’re both Southerners ourselves.”

 

Photo by Brinson+Banks.

Noel Braham. Photo by Brinson+Banks.

Photo by Brinson+Banks.

Jimmy Chin named one of “The World’s 25 Most Adventurous Men” by Men’s Journal

Our favorite mountaineer, skier, photographer, and director Jimmy Chin is featured on the cover of Men’s Journal‘s May issue, which celebrates “The World’s 25 Most Adventurous Men.” In the accompanying interview, Jimmy—who was photographed alongside English businessman, thrill seeker, and aspiring space traveler Richard Branson and famed first-ascent kayaker Ben Stookesberry—talks about not fulfilling his parents’ expectations for him to become a doctor, lawyer, or professor; his near-death experience after an avalanche while attempting to ascend the daunting Shark’s Fin (if you’ve seen Jimmy’s award-winning documentary, Meru, you know the story); and the time his mom got a brigadier general in Pakistan to check on her son after she heard he’d taken a bad fall in the Karakoram Mountains.

“We were sending back daily dispatches via satellite phone when I took this big fall, and my teammates were like, great, let’s post that!” Jimmy recalls. “Two days later, we’re about to summit and we see this team of soldiers at the base of the wall. We’re all freaking out — are they here to arrest us? — till one of them gets on the loudspeaker and goes: ‘Jimmy Chin . . . your mother wants to know if you’re OK. . . !’ Somehow, she’d gotten hold of the brigadier general and demanded they send a team to check on me. It was the most mortifying moment in my life.”

Read the interview here.

 

Ben Stookesberry, Richard Branson, and Jimmy Chin on the cover of Men’s Journal’s May 2017 issue. Photo by Ruven Afanador.

 

See more of Michael Muller’s movie posters for the upcoming blockbuster “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”

Photo by Michael Muller.

Photo by Michael Muller.

Photo by Michael Muller.

Photo by Michael Muller.

Photo by Michael Muller.

Photo by Michael Muller.

Photo by Michael Muller.

Photo by Michael Muller.

%d bloggers like this: