Doug Menuez travels to Chicago and Minneapolis to document FedEx office culture and the local lifestyle for new image library

See Doug’s past shoots for FedEx—in Bangkok, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Hungary, and more—here.

 

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

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Photo by Doug Menuez for FedEx.

Melanie Acevedo’s “Another 52 Weeks”: sibling revelry

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Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

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Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

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Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

 

Follow “Another 52 Weeks”: 52weeks.melanieacevedo.com

Steven Lippman shoots “Touring in Style,” a fashion story centering on the sleek Aston Martin DB11, for the cover of Robb Report

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Photo by Steven Lippman for Robb Report.

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Photo by Steven Lippman for Robb Report.

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Photo by Steven Lippman for Robb Report.

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Photo by Steven Lippman for Robb Report.

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Photo by Steven Lippman for Robb Report.

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Photo by Steven Lippman for Robb Report.

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Photo by Steven Lippman for Robb Report.

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Photo by Steven Lippman for Robb Report.

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Photo by Steven Lippman for Robb Report.

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Photo by Steven Lippman for Robb Report.

 

View the story on Readymag: robbreport.stevenlippman.com

credits

SVP/design director: Ken Debie
art director: Rufus Agbede
wardrobe: Milka Prica
wardrobe assistant: Patty Basil
makeup: Gudrun Kosloff
hair: David Keough
production: 3Star Productions
Steven’s first assistant: Eric Larson
Steven’s second assistant: Justin Mehren
BTS motion: Ricky Lesser

Kwaku Alston photographs Viola Davis and Denzel Washington, who costar in the Oscar-nominated movie “Fences,” for the cover of Essence

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Viola Davis, an Oscar nominee for Best Supporting Actress for “Fences,” and Denzel Washington, who costars and directed the film. “Fences” was also nominated in the Best Picture category. Photo by Kwaku Alston for Essence.

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Photo by Kwaku Alston for Essence.

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Photo by Kwaku Alston for Essence.

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Photo by Kwaku Alston for Essence.

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Photo by Kwaku Alston for Essence.

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Photo by Kwaku Alston for Essence.

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Photo by Kwaku Alston for Essence.

Nino Muñoz shoots publicity images for the movie “Fifty Shades Darker”

Nino Muñoz photographed the stars of Fifty Shades DarkerDakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan, and Kim Basinger—for the movie’s publicity campaign. Below, some of the many highlights from his shoot…

 

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Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson. Photo by Nino Muñoz for Universal Pictures.

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Photo by Nino Muñoz for Universal Pictures.

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Photo by Nino Muñoz for Universal Pictures.

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Kim Basinger. Photo by Nino Muñoz for Universal Pictures.

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Photo by Nino Muñoz for Universal Pictures.

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Photo by Nino Muñoz for Universal Pictures.

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Nino directing Dornan and Johnson on set. Photo by Zachary Benge.

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Photo by Zachary Benge.

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Photo by Zachary Benge.

 

Art Streiber on photographing Jimmy Kimmel, the host of this year’s Oscars, for the cover of Variety

“In the footsteps of Bob Hope, Johnny Carson, and Billy Crystal, here comes Jimmy Kimmel to host the Oscars! Jimmy is dry and witty and completely up to the task. In front of the camera, he is completely game and actually willing to go too far,” says Art Streiber, who photographed Kimmel for the cover of Variety.

“Oscar hosts are usually on a tight schedule from just after Thanksgiving and running straight through to Oscar night. They’ve got jokes to write, television promos to shoot, interviews to do, opening montages to star in, and photo shoots to do—all while still working at their day jobs. And that’s exactly what Jimmy was dealing with when my crew and I spent an hour with him on a Friday afternoon in mid December.

We had to be incredibly respectful of Jimmy’s time, and we had three different looks to accomplish: We had to photograph Jimmy on white, with some very glittery gold curtains, and in silhouette. So…we had to figure out a way to get all three of those looks in a hurry and on a budget!

Our brilliant digital tech, Eric Vlasic of With Technology, suggested that we simply raise our gold shimmery curtains over Jimmy’s head in order to shoot against the white cyc. And it worked!

I asked Jimmy if the show writes itself, and he replied, ‘Absolutely not. If it did, it wouldn’t be funny.’”

 

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Jimmy Kimmel. Photo by Art Streiber for Variety.

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Photo by Art Streiber for Variety.

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Photo by Art Streiber for Variety.

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Photo by Art Streiber for Variety.

 

 

 

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Art stands in for Jimmy. Production still courtesy Art Streiber Photography.

 

For this week’s Variety magazine cover story about how Jimmy Kimmel is going to kill it at the Oscars on Sunday…we needed shimmery gold curtains. So we splurged and went to Party City in West LA and bought the 8' gold doorway curtains for $8.99. Then we built two 12’ lengths of curtains and lit the back set of curtains with two small strips aimed at the middle of the curtains in order to have the light fall off on the top and bottom. We flagged the strips because we layered Jimmy in between the two sets of curtains and we didn’t want any of that light to spill onto our subject. The light in front was a skinned Elinchrom octabank and a head with a 7” reflector set just inside the top of the octabank, which gave the curtains (and Jimmy) a very shiny look. Thank you to @tylerthings for a great production and for purchasing sushi and muffins for breakfast. Thank you to @belioff and @jamesbianchi for building the light and eating the sushi and muffins. And thank you to Eric Vlasic for having the good sense to suggest that we raise the gold curtains (as opposed to rolling them off the set) when we needed to shoot against the white cyc. @elinchrom_ltd @profotglobal @partycity…seriously. @jimmykimmellive @jimmykimmel #jimmykimmel #Oscars @Variety @theacademy #lucianwynnisthegoldenchild

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Bill and Maureen’s advice to photographers seeking representation

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Bill Stockland and Maureen Martel. Photo by Kwaku Alston. Click image to read the interview.

 

Photo editor and writer Heidi Volpe recently interviewed a handful of top reps for an article aimed at photographers looking for representation, and Stockland Martel was honored to be among those included. Below, Bill Stockland and Maureen Martel’s answers to Heidi’s questions. Read the full story—which also features Deborah Schwartz of DSREPS, Carol LeFlufy of Eye Forward, and Marilyn Cadenbach of Cadenbach.comat APA’s website.

 

What are some of the most important aspects you look for in a book when considering adding to your roster? 

Maureen Martel: We keep an eye toward the industry to see the emerging trends, what the market is responding to. But almost all of our photographers came to us through recommendations.

Bill is the gatekeeper; if he likes the photographer and his/her style, Bill will introduce the photographer to our team. That strong style needs to apply to our strengths as an agency.

We always review work looking for that extra layer of exceptional perspective. It helps if their vision applies to more than one of the photographic categories that we promote to: advertising, entertainment, fashion, and editorial. There is so much great work out there, but we ask, “How does it apply to our client base? And does that work also complement the work of the photographers we already represent?”

Bill Stockland: An overriding element for us is people need to live and breathe what they do. Shooting and creating work has to be part of who they are, as if it’s a part of their life force.  Walter Iooss and Nadav Kander were two of the first photographers on the Stockland Martel roster, and we still represent them. What struck us about their work was it was unequivocally their own voice, and we saw a strong application to the industry.

The expression of who they are is defined by their work; it’s a gift to truly express yourself via your images. There is no holding back, no fakery, no repeating the marketplace. It’s an honest expression of who they are as people. This is key for us as an agency. Walter has been shooting as a pro since he was 17! Our photographers have this thing that is not taught. Again, it’s back to the essence of their true self.

Maureen: When we take on a photographer, we look at their entire archive and edit the photographer’s work with our marketplace in mind. Visually defining the photographer’s style is critical to the packaging of the talent. The art producers and creatives need to immediately see the application of the style to their needs.

Besides visual style, it is essential that the photographer have a professional manner. We are not only promoting the style but the photographer’s ability to execute the assignment with grace.

They don’t get to bid if they aren’t talented, but once you are in the bid, it becomes about your understanding of how to express your ideas, including how you would problem-solve the job. This includes how you conduct yourself on the conference call, how you prepare treatments, applying your experience to all phases of the job—from the bidding process to the production and very often through postproduction. The photographer has to be proficient in all elements of the process.

 

If a photographer doesn’t have a large existing client base, does this give you pause?

Maureen: Stockland Martel is known for our ability to broaden the markets of the photographers we represent. In the past, we’ve taken fully mature international talent and brought them to the US marketplace. We’ve redefined US talent, repackaging and expanding their territory: editorial photographers into the advertising market, and advertising photographers into the editorial market and the entertainment industry. Liz Von Hoene had a large retail base, and we brought her to into the advertising market, for example.

To bring a new talent into this marketplace without an existing client base is challenging today.  The photographer needs to be prepared to work diligently on all creative opportunities, whether or not there is a big payday. Building their name recognition through new editorial and personal work is essential to cross them over into the advertising, entertainment, and fashion markets.

Stockland Martel has skilled and talented sales and marketing teams, but the photographer today needs to also be managing their own social media and networking opportunities.

Bill: Today’s marketplace requires some kind of base, be it editorial, advertising, retail, or commercial. We keep an eye toward the body of work the photographer is creating and the repeatability of such great work.

The time required to build name recognition of new talent makes it much harder of late, since the talent pool is so deep and expansive.

So, yes, we look for a photographer’s client base, whatever that may be. We look for an opportunity to take their base and morph it into a new market.

Creation of work is important to us. New work is essential, as the market needs to have a steady base of great work and it’s vital to continually to push that work out. If you can’t, then you will not be able to compete.

 

How do you like to be pitched for new talent?

Bill: Most of our new talent comes to us from referrals. We are always on the lookout, but I generally don’t go out and call on talent because I don’t want to poach anyone. For example, years ago Timothy Greenfield-Sanders had photos from his Mary Boone Gallery show featured in New York magazine. We contacted him because we loved those photos. Shortly thereafter, he was shooting a campaign of celebrities for Barney’s because of that show and his amazing 20×24 Polaroids.

If we do get pitched, we want them to know who we are, what we are about, and to have a strong understanding of the agency and how they might fit.

 

What is your best advice in prepping a book for meeting with a potential rep?

Maureen: Portfolios, in the past, were requested by art producers as their main selling tool to get a photography assignment.  Now that the Internet is used as the primary vehicle to select photographers for assignments, portfolios today are used primarily by the photographer and their representative for meetings. Their entire portfolio package should be perfect. Even the portfolio shipping case should reflect the photographer’s personal style. The work can be individual prints or behind plastic, but the edit needs to be more than well-considered. When meeting with a potential rep, the photographer should show their range of photography but be prepared to talk about where they think the work applies.

Our most successful photographers know where they fit into the market. Those who can express this succinctly are the reps’ most powerful collaborators.

If the photographer is going to succeed in this marketplace, they need to be completely committed and focused on their career. We meet a lot of extraordinary talent. Those who come from other disciplines simply to make money can be a challenge. One has to be committed to the process, committed to the team’s sales and marketing strategy, and committed to the collaboration.

 

What are some misconceptions about the working relationship?

Bill: Most important, when we started the business we could control the outreach a bit more to the agencies. It was much more personable and paced differently. Think about the vehicles back then. There was no social media, no Internet, no online viral campaigns, no immediacy to the content. It was door-to-door sales, and this has changed dramatically.

Once the Web emerged, we took on that outreach and now have a full-time creative director and a full-time digital assets manager. We understand the importance of the new landscape and what that requires.

It’s critical that our photographers are creating new work, and they need to be managing their own outreach, their own social media, wining and dining—personally doing their own part.

We also feel it’s essential to connect with the agencies and the market via small creative groups. Our talent takes part in lectures, personal shows, industry events. This is all part of our marketing strategy, and we feel their efforts have to be shoulder to shoulder with ours.

Michael Muller is a fine example of this. This is something that comes naturally to Michael, and he shines in that arena. He has a large personal body of work on sharks he is passionate about. He published a book with Taschen, had a show at the Taschen Gallery in Los Angeles, has been invited to speak internationally about this important social issue and, of course, the work. He is constantly out in the community, connecting, pushing forward, active in social media, active in giving back to the industry with his time and talent. Michael has taken his personal work to a whole other level. He is the real deal.

On the other end of the spectrum, we have newly signed Brinson+Banks. The husband-and-wife team started out in photojournalism in the South, and they live and breathe what they do 24/7. They knew their path moving to LA, knew what they wanted to do with their talent and unique eye and how that could make themselves a standout in the celebrity portrait arena. This appealed to our group.

They had done their homework, shooting constantly on their own, and this made them equipped to be a part of our agency. We understood how their photojournalism and street photography could make them a standout in the LA community. They have a wonderful ongoing series called “LA Woman.” This body of work shows their range as photographers and ability to produce, connect with their subjects, and capture intimate portraits, and this we know is not an easy task. That same skill has captured the eye of many publications, and Brinson+Banks are called upon for celebrity portraits and have had a steady stream of work with both The New York Times and Variety.

Tobias Hutzler creates trippy images for Fast Company’s profile of the Drone Racing League

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Photo by Tobias Hutzler for Fast Company, March 2017 issue.

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Photo by Tobias Hutzler for Fast Company

Art Streiber shoots wonderfully creepy key art for season five of the A&E drama “Bates Motel”

In season five of A&E‘s hit series Bates Motel, Norma (played by Vera Farmiga) is dead but vividly lives on in the mind of her obsessive son, Norman (Freddie Highmore). The network commissioned Art Streiber to capture the creepiness of this new chapter in their, um, relationship, in the show’s key art. This is the second time he’s photographed key art for the show. See his work for season two here.

Scroll down to see his Instagram posts on how he lit each setup, etc.

 

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Photo by Art Streiber for A&E.

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Photo by Art Streiber for A&E.

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Photo by Art Streiber for A&E.

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Photo by Art Streiber for A&E.

 

Coming soon: From one of two shoots this past weekend in Vancouver…some would say "too many flags and nets." Others would say, “use a smaller source.” I say, this is what happens when you walk away from one of your sets to attend to the other three sets you’ve got going for the key art shoot for the final season of a hit television show, and the crew goes nuts! Why is the bed on an angle? To alleviate the need to be hanging right over the subject’s head when you’re looking for that “top down” POV. The big soft main comes from camera right and the umbrella is aimed at the 12x bleached muslin over head as fill.And yes, we shot stills and motion from that scissor lift. Multiple thank yous to @luvlouella @tomkone @paoloalfante (who was actually in town for the other shoot) @happyharleyproductions @adelethomas0 @_jesse_yuen Jeff Vogeding @gpnphoto and an amazing guy named Murray.

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And the result…one of five key art pieces for the final season of “Bates Motel,” the prequel to “Psycho,” starring Vera Farming and Freddy Highmore as Norma and Norman Bates. Big, soft key light at camera right and a soft fill from an umbrella bounced into a bleached muslin right over the camera…and…a gridded spot about two stops under, attached to the scissor lift, just to light up their hands. Multiple thank yous to @luvlouella @tomkone @paoloalfante (who was actually in town for the other shoot) @happyharleyproductions @adelethomas0 @_jesse_yuen Jeff Vogeding, @gpnphoto, an amazing guy named Murray and masterfully post produced by @angiemariehayes. And an extra huge thank you to @thatothergrassogirl and her team at A&E who come to the party with great ideas and turns our team loose to pull off those concepts in the best way we see fit! @insidebates #batesmotel @profotousa @hasselblad_official @verafarmiga #verafarmiga @freddiehighmoreofficial #freddiehighmore @batesmotelobsession @instacinefilos

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And the result…An homage to the Season One Key Art of “Bates Motel,” the prequel to “Psycho,” starring Vera Farming and Freddy Highmore as Norma and Norman Bates. This is one of five key art pieces for the final season of “Bates.” The main is a 12x silk at camera right with an Elinchrom Octobank behind it and a gird wrapped around the 12 x silk. Fill is another 12x silk and 2 large soft boxes right behind it. Look up the Season One Key Art and put this side by side with the original and you’ll see what the network was up to: updating (and tweaking) a classic. Multiple thank yous to @luvlouella @tomkone @paoloalfante @happyharleyproductions @adelethomas0 @_jesse_yuen Jeff Vogeding, @gpnphoto and an amazing guy named Murray. And an extra huge thank you to @thatothergrassogirl and her team at A&E who come to the party with great ideas and turns our team loose to pull off those concepts in the best way we see fit! @insidebates #batesmotel @profotousa @hasselblad_official @elinchrom_ltd @verafarmiga #verafarmiga @freddiehighmoreofficial #freddiehighmore @batesmotelobsession @instacinefilos

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“Bates” Part 2…one of two shots on this motel room set…both involving the leads of “Bates Motel” and a bed. Creepy. They’re mother and son! If you squint and put both of your thumbs on this image and then move your thumbs in opposing directions, you can see the set mentioned yesterday with the too-many flags and the other prop bed in the background. Multiple thank yous to @luvlouella @tomkone @paoloalfante @happyharleyproductions @adelethomas0 @_jesse_yuen Jeff Vogeding, @gpnphoto and an amazing guy named Murray. And an extra huge thank you to @thatothergrassogirl and her team at A&E who come to the party with great ideas and turns our team loose to pull off those concepts in the best way we see fit! @insidebates #batesmotel @profotousa @elinchrom_ltd @hasselblad_official @verafarmiga #verafarmiga @freddiehighmoreofficial #freddiehighmore

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And the result…Norman and Norma aren’t normal…they snuggle! One of five key art pieces for the final season of “Bates Motel,” the prequel to “Psycho,” starring Vera Farming and Freddy Highmore as Norma and Norman Bates. The key light is a small Chimera soft box, gridded and covered in muslin slightly overhead and the fill is a large box right behind the camera. We also threw a streak of moon light / street light on the back wall. Multiple thank yous to @luvlouella @tomkone @paoloalfante (who was actually in town for the other shoot) @happyharleyproductions @adelethomas0 @_jesse_yuen Jeff Vogeding, @gpnphoto and an amazing guy named Murray. And an extra huge thank you to @thatothergrassogirl and her team at A&E who come to the party with great ideas and turns our team loose to pull off those concepts in the best way we see fit! @insidebates #batesmotel @profotousa @hasselblad_official @verafarmiga #verafarmiga @freddiehighmoreofficial #freddiehighmore @batesmotelobsession @instacinefilos

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Spooning with mother…?Welcome back to “Bates Motel” Week!!! For this set up, in which Norman and Norma are lying in bed next to each other, the key light is a small Chimera soft box, gridded and covered in muslin and just slightly overhead and the fill is a large box right behind the camera. And for good measure we also threw a streak of moon light / street light on the back wall. Multiple thank yous to @luvlouella @tomkone @paoloalfante @happyharleyproductions @adelethomas0 @_jesse_yuen Jeff Vogeding, @gpnphoto and an amazing guy named Murray. And an extra huge thank you to @thatothergrassogirl and her team at A&E who come to the party with great ideas and turns our team loose to pull off those concepts in the best way we see fit! @insidebates #batesmotel @profotousa @hasselblad_official @verafarmiga #verafarmiga @freddiehighmoreofficial #freddiehighmore @batesmotelobsession @instacinefilos

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Melanie Acevedo’s “Another 52 Weeks”: fur-ever friends

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Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

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Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

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Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

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Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

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Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

 

Follow “Another 52 Weeks.”

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