Melanie Acevedo’s “Another 52 Weeks”: Happy Memorial Day weekend!

Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

 

Follow “Another 52 Weeks”: 52weeks.melanieacevedo.com

 

Presenting “Montauk Rocks,” a still-life study by Nigel Cox

If you live here in New York City, you are perhaps among the fortunate folks who are excitedly looking forward to opening their beach rental this holiday weekend to kick off the summer season. With sunshine, sand, and surf in mind, we present “Montauk Rocks,” a photo series by Nigel Cox inspired by his time in the iconic New York surf town.

 

Photo by Nigel Cox, from his series “Montauk Rocks.”

Photo by Nigel Cox, from his series “Montauk Rocks.”

Photo by Nigel Cox, from his series “Montauk Rocks.”

Photo by Nigel Cox, from his series “Montauk Rocks.”

Photo by Nigel Cox, from his series “Montauk Rocks.”

Photo by Nigel Cox, from his series “Montauk Rocks.”

Photo by Nigel Cox, from his series “Montauk Rocks.”

Photo by Nigel Cox, from his series “Montauk Rocks.”

Highlights from Lauren Greenfield’s “Generation Wealth” press tour: “In so many ways, Trump and his rise was the apotheosis of Generation Wealth”

Click to view the gallery and read the story.

 

“I did not expect Trump to win the election, but when he did, it was kind of like the content of this work, of the 25 years, bearing out. In so many ways, Trump and his rise was the apotheosis of Generation Wealth. There were so many commonalities between him and David Siegel [one of the main subjects in Greenfield’s documentary, The Queen of Versailles, about a wealthy family before, during, and after the financial crisis], from the love for gold and the aesthetic of luxury, to the owning beauty pageants, to beautiful women in their personal life being an expression of their success, to making money in real estate. That’s more for Trump than for David Siegel, but certainly a theme in the book, the power of celebrity. But I think in terms of the populist part, there’s a quote from Fran Lebowitz that I put in the front of the book about how Americans don’t resent the rich because they always imagine that will be them someday. I think that is part of the admiration for Trump. Unlike some other cultures that resent the rich or resent the upper class, Americans admire wealth.” (Read the full article in The Atlantic.)

 

Click to read.

 

Click to listen to the interview with Monocle.

 

“The title [of the book] also refers to this kind of breaking with the values of a past generation, against the backdrop of the great income inequality that we have now. The fact that so much of the wealth is concentrated in so few, and that we no longer have the social mobility that used to define the American dream, and that really defined it in my parents’ generation.” (Click to read the article at W magazine.)

 

Click to read.

 

Click to view the gallery at The Guardian.

 

“I think the backdrop of these 25 years is that we’ve never had more inequality and we’ve never had less social mobility. So, in a way, fictitious social mobility—bling and presentation—has replaced real social mobility … because it’s all you can get.” (Click to read the interview with NPR.)

 

Click to read.

 

Despite the many tableaus filled with high-end fashion and solid gold embellishments, there’s little sense of reverence or desire for riches. Greenfield turns the gods of capitalism into humans, then places them next to their worshipers. If there’s a diagnosis of society, it’s that dissatisfaction crawls out of the gap between the projection of wealth and its reality. (Click to read the Hyperallergic article.)

 

Click to read.

 

In her live interview with the Economist’s Anne McElvoy last night at the Design Museum in London, Generation Wealth photographer Lauren Greenfield proved she was as engaging a talker as she is a photographer. In a wide-ranging chat that encompassed the difference between old and new money, the ever mutating pursuit of the American Dream, how the expression of success has changed dramatically in our lifetime and why Brits incorrectly assume they’re above it all, Greenfield also revealed her attempts to shoot US president Donald Trump for her Generation Wealth project. (Read the article at Phaidon.)

Click to read.

Brinson+Banks photograph “Transparent” and “I Love Dick” creator Jill Soloway for The New York Times

Playwright, writer, and director Jill Soloway. Photo by Brinson+Banks for The New York Times.

Photo by Brinson+Banks for The New York Times.

 

Read the article: “Chris Kraus and Jill Soloway Talk About the Show I Love Dick

 

Nadav Kander photographs actress Aisling Foster for the poster for “The Treatment,” Almeida Theatre’s acclaimed production of the Martin Crimp play

Photo by Nadav Kander for Almeida Theatre.

Miller Mobley photographs Universal Music Group artists Post Malone, Julia Michaels, Amine, and Marian Hill for the cover of Hits magazine

From left: Post Malone, Julia Michael, Amine, and Marian Hill’s Samantha Gongol and Jeremy Lloyd. Photo by Miller Mobley for Hits, March 13, 2017, issue/

Marian Hill. Photo by Miller Mobley for Hits.

 

Nino Muñoz photographs “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” star Zoe Saldana for the cover of Shape’s June issue

Zoe Saldana. Photo by Nino Muñoz for Shape, June 2017 issue.

Photos by Nino Muñoz for Shape.

Photo by Nino Muñoz for Shape.

Photo by Nino Muñoz for Shape.

Photo by Nino Muñoz for Shape.

Photo by Nino Muñoz for Shape.

Jeff Lipsky photographs the young stars of the movie “The Book of Henry” for Vanity Fair

The young stars of the upcoming movie “The Book of Henry” (from left): Jacob Tremblay, who costarred with Oscar winner Brie Larson in “Room,” Jaeden Lieberher, and Maddie Ziegler. Photo by Jeff Lipsky for Vanity Fair.

Photo by Jeff Lipsky for Vanity Fair.

Photo by Jeff Lipsky for Vanity Fair.

Miller Mobley photographs Sherry Lansing, the first woman in Hollywood to head a major film studio, for the cover of The Hollywood Reporter

Sherry Lansing. Photo by Miller Mobley for The Hollywood Reporter, March 29, 2017, issue.

Photo by Miller Mobley for The Hollywood Reporter.

Photo by Miller Mobley for The Hollywood Reporter.

Photo by Miller Mobley for The Hollywood Reporter.

Jimmy Chin’s dramatic photo for The New York Times Magazine a winner at SPD’s 52nd Annual Design Competition

Jimmy Chin‘s photo of Jamison Walsh climbing to the top of 1 World Trade Center—shot for Kathy Ryan at The New York Times Magazine—won the top prize in the cover category at the Society of Publication Designers’ 52nd Annual Design Competition. The cover also won a Gold Cube from the Art Directors Club in the cover category. Congrats, Jimmy and Kathy! Read about the shoot.

 

Photo by Jimmy Chin.

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