Time magazine features Brinson+Banks’ “LA Woman” portrait series

“Los Angeles is a hotbed of creativity and promise. But it can also feel isolated and unreceptive. For photographic duo Kendrick Brinson and David Walter Banks, their new project, ‘LA Woman,’ was an opportunity to showcase this wealth of female talent whilst connecting women within their community,” writes Alexandra Genova in her introduction to “The Creative Women of Los Angeles,” published on Time magazine’s Lightbox blog.

The ongoing portrait series features young creatives in their homes, which the photo duo are usually seeing for the first time when they arrive for the shoot. “We really reserve these as a time for total spontaneity,” David tells Genova. The couple could have opted to match the person with a location of their own choosing but made a conscious decision to photograph their subjects in their natural environment. “I think someone’s home is a good representation of who they are,” Kendrick says in the interview. “If it’s sloppy or if there’s beautiful art everywhere…it’s a way to visually show someone’s personality beyond how they dress or how they do their hair.”

Notes Genova, “Brinson and Banks’ offbeat style translates personality into beautiful imagery.”

Read the complete interview here. View the ongoing “LA Woman” portfolio here.

 

Click image to read the article at time.com.

 

Click image to view the “LA Woman” portfolio at stocklandmartel.com.

Presenting “Patagonia,” a new portrait series by Martin Sigal

“On South America’s southern frontier, nature grows wild, barren and beautiful. Spaces are large, as are the silences that fill them. For the newly arrived, such emptiness can be as impressive as the sight of Patagonia’s jagged peaks, pristine rivers and dusty backwater oases.” Lonely Planet‘s gorgeous description of Patagonia is a fitting introduction to this series of portraits by award-winning Bueno Aires–based photographer Martin Sigal, who captures the wildness, mystery, and isolation of the region by way of some of the people who call it home…

 

Photo by Martin Sigal, from his series “Patagonia.”

Photo by Martin Sigal, from his series “Patagonia.”

Photo by Martin Sigal, from his series “Patagonia.”

Photo by Martin Sigal, from his series “Patagonia.”

Photo by Martin Sigal, from his series “Patagonia.”

Photo by Martin Sigal, from his series “Patagonia.”

Photo by Martin Sigal, from his series “Patagonia.”

Photo by Martin Sigal, from his series “Patagonia.”

Photo by Martin Sigal, from his series “Patagonia.”

Photo by Martin Sigal, from his series “Patagonia.”

Photo by Martin Sigal, from his series “Patagonia.”

Work by Art Streiber and Annabel Mehran honored in the ASME’s Best Cover Contest

Art Streiber was a finalist in the Best Entertainment and Celebrity and Best Sports and Fitness categories at this year’s Best Cover Contest, a competition organized by the American Society of Magazine Editors, and Annabel Mehran was the Readers’ Choice Winner in the Brainiest category. Congrats to both of you!

 

Click image to view the work.

Click image to view the work.

Click image to view the work.

Kwaku Alston photographs author and activist Terry Tempest Williams for the cover of Experience Life

Terry Tempest Williams. Photo by Kwaku Alston for Experience Life, April 2017 issue.

Photo by Kwaku Alston for Experience Life.

Photo by Kwaku Alston for Experience Life.

 

Kelly Ripa on Miller Mobley: “He is the magic photographer. He’s magic, he’s magic, he’s magic.”

Miller Mobley recently photographed Kelly Ripa, Anderson Cooper, and Andy Cohen for The Hollywood Reporter‘s cover story on “The 35 Most Powerful People in Media,” and the experience really made an impression on his famous subjects.

“We all agree that we’ve—all of us have never looked so good in our lives,” Ripa later said on her show, Live with Kelly. “He is the magic photographer. He’s magic, he’s magic, he’s magic.”

Below, highlights from the magical shoot…

 

Andy Cohen, Kelly Ripa, and Anderson Cooper. Photo by Miller Mobley for The Hollywood Reporter, April 13, 2017, issue.

Photo by Miller Mobley for The Hollywood Reporter.

Photo by Miller Mobley for The Hollywood Reporter.

Photo by Miller Mobley for The Hollywood Reporter.

 

Nadav Kander photographs his daughter, Talia Kander, for Süddeutsche Zeitung Magazin

“While the camera scrutinized her,” says Nadav, “she in her quiet way slowly felt her way to become her natural self.”

 

Talia Kander in Thames Estuary Rain, 2017. Photo by Nadav Kander.

Photo by Nadav Kander.

 

 

 

At the Spring Hackathon in New York this month, college students competed in a high-pressure 24-hour coding spree. Doug Menuez, who was there to document the next generation of fearless geniuses, takes us behind the scenes

What’s the tech counterpart to marathons and triathlons? Hackathons. And earlier this month, New York University was host to a big one organized by hackNY, a nonprofit organization whose stated aim is “to federate the next generation of hackers for the New York innovation community.”

The Spring Hackathon—there’s also one in the fall—drew hundreds of students from universities around the country to “participate in collaborative and creative coding challenges in a 24-hour coding sprint.”

Doug Menuez, whose interest in technological innovation can be traced back to the years he spent documenting the digital revolution in Silicon Valley (as seen in his recent monograph Fearless Genius), documented the intense, exhausting, exhilarating day of hacking.

“I was there as a guest of HackNY and their partner Major League Hacking to shoot as part of my continuing Fearless Genius project (fearlessgenius.org), which documented the early days of Silicon Valley and now looks at where we are today and heading next with new technology,” says Doug.

“The kids broke into teams and hacked all day Saturday and through the night on their ideas to be ready to present to the judges on Sunday. The prizes are awarded based on the ‘awesomeness’ of the idea and execution of the code. The students got 90 seconds to present their hacks.”

It was a high-pressure situation, but also one that was full of possibility.

“I was personally inspired by the energy and wide-open creative mindset of these extremely diverse kids,” says Doug. “These are the next generation of innovators and entrepreneurs that will shape our future—attention must be paid.”

He continues, “In New York startup culture, I see a similar passion and idealism that infused Silicon Valley in the early days. They wanted to build tools to improve our lives. Money was secondary, at first. They had purpose. At this hackathon, the top prize was for the best idea to benefit society—very cool. So I’m hopeful these kids might help build a better future, and maybe even save the planet.”

See more of Doug’s Spring Hackathon photos here.

 

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Photo by Doug Menuez.

Melanie Acevedo’s “Another 52 Weeks”: Where’s Rocky?

Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

Photo by Melanie Acevedo, from her ongoing series “Another 52 Weeks.”

 

Follow “Another 52 Weeks”: 52weeks.melanieacevedo.com

Nadav Kander shoots campaign for Mercedes-Benz

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Photo by Nadav Kander for Mercedes-Benz.

Introducing set designer and prop master Hayley Callander

Photos by (clockwise from top) Danny Cohen, Neil Bailey, and Stuart Crossett.

 

Stockland Martel is pleased to announce that set designer and prop master Hayley Callander has joined our roster. Hayley is known for her innovative conceptual design, technical skills, and ability to cleverly problem solve in even the most challenging of circumstances. Her extensive experience includes set and costume design, prop building, fashion shows, editorials, and music videos, and her clients range from Coca-Cola and Cadbury, to Mazda and Mini Cooper, to L’Oreal, Heineken, and Nokia.

 

Photos by (top row) Scott Newett and (bottom) Hugh Peachy.

 

Influenced by cinema and possessing a quick wit, Hayley designs highly charged compositions, while her stylized approach to set and wardrobe create a heightened, saturated, dreamlike quality. She prefers manual processes and often experiments with special effects to design and create props, costumes, and sets. She once produced a jacket made entirely of slices of toasted bread for a beer ad, made real people look like life-size plastic models for a transportation campaign, and created a snow-globe helmet—complete with quaint landscape—for a personal project.

 

Photos by (top row) Andreas Bommert and (bottom) Scott Newett.

 

“I enjoy the complex narrative of visual communication and the creative process of sewing concepts together. The more insane the idea, the better, in my book,” says Hayley, whose many inspirations range from pop-up books, Tokyo in spring, Dali’s mustache, and Yves Klein’s blue to Warhol‘s Polaroids, Wes Anderson’s palette, “Gregory Crewdson‘s everything,” anthropomorphic memes, La Nouvelle Vague, “New Wave of New Wave,” Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Holy Mountain, Velázquez’s Las Meninas, cats in pajamas, and “the cat’s pajamas!”

 

Photos by (from left) Hugh Peachey and Alex Aslangul.

 

View Hayley’s portfolio at stocklandmartel.com/callander.

 

Follow her on Instagram at @hayleycallander.

 

 

For a peek at Hayley’s creative process, click here or on the image below.

 

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