Highlights from Pro Photo Daily: photos taking over Twitter, the revival of 8×10 instant film, a new doc on a historic photograph, and more

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written by David Schonauer

Trending: 36 Percent of Tweets Are Now Photos
Like many social networks, Twitter started out as a place for making announcements. That changed when Twitter rolled out expanded tweets earlier this year, reports SocialTimes. According to a recent study, status updates account for only seven percent of the activity on Twitter, while photos from sites like Instagram and Tumblr make up 36 percent. Many news publications have also teamed with Twitter to expand their headlines with a photo and an opening paragraph. The new trend is all explained in a handy infographic. Full story at SocialTimes

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Doc Film Explores “Lunch Atop a Skyscraper” Photo
The exciting new film, titled “Men at Lunch,” by Seán Ó Cualáin, looks at Charles C. Ebbets’s iconic 1932 shot of workmen relaxing on a girder high above New York City. Full story at Peta Pixel

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Study: Photos Help Charities Raise Money
How generously people give to charities is influenced by where they live … and by how often they see people in need, a new study concludes. As PDN Pulse notes, the finding has implications for photographers and for non-profit orgs that need compelling storytelling to help them raise money. “Simply seeing someone in need at the grocery store…can serve as basic psychological reminders of the needs of other people,” says Paul Piff, a postdoctoral scholar in psychology at the University of California at Berkeley. Full story at PDN Pulse

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Trending: IKEA’s New Catalogs Feature Less Pine, More Pixels
In an effort to save money, Swedish boxed-furniture maker IKEA is beginning to use computer-graphic imagery rather than actual photos in its catalogs, reports the Wall Street Journal. Previously, IKEA spent more than two-thirds of its marketing budget building and photographing sets for its catalogs. This year, 12 percent of its catalog and web content was rendered virtually; that number will increase to 25 percent next year. The company says it is retraining all of its photographers, carpenters, and set designers for the new 3D environment. Full story at The Wall Street Journal

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Impossible Project Reinvents 8×10 Instant Film
The tech news in photography that has everyone talking today is not about pixels, but film: The Impossible Project—a group of ardent instant-film aficionados that has already revived various lines of film for Polaroid cameras—has announced the creation of a new line of 8×10 instant film, reports PetaPixel. “While the 8-by-10 format was never Polaroid’s most popular consumer product, the film’s appeal for professional photographers had always been clear,” notes the New York Times. “It could mean the promise of a remake or at least a close approximation to many other instant films that analog image makers have been missing since Polaroid gave up making instant films,” hopes Pixiq. “It was another lucky accident,” says Impossible Project founder Florian Kaps in an interview with the British Journal of Photography. Full story at the British Journal of Photography

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These industry news highlights were collected from last week’s editions of American Photography’s Pro Photo Daily newsletter. To subscribe, visit http://www.ai-ap.com/register/. A complete archive of Pro Photo Daily newsletters is available at http://www.ai-ap.com/prophotodaily/. Visit Pro Photo Daily on Facebook.

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