More “Supermodels of the 70s and 80s”

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The opening night last Thursday for Timothy Greenfield-Sanders exhibition “Supermodels of 70s and 80s,” at Steven Kasher Gallery in Chelsea, was mobbed. And among the crowd were various members of the press, including some Page Sixers from the New York Post

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As I mentioned last week, the exhibition features portraits Timothy made of onetime supermodels like Carol Alt, Cheryl Tiegs, and Christie Brinkley. The photographs were an interesting contrast with and complement to the other body of work on view at Steven Kasher: “Feminist Portraits, 1974-1977,” a fantastic series of black-and-white photos by Cynthia MacAdams. At the opening, I spotted fashion journalist Lynn Yaeger, who wrote about the event for the Sundance Channel’s Full Frontal Fashion blog. “MacAdams’s and Greenfield-Sanders’s photographs share a sense of solidarity,” she wrote. “Each portrait captured a look of power in the eyes, a silent confidence.”

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"Michelle Phillips & Aloma Ichinose Gruskoff at Aloma's 33rd Birthday Party," 1976, by Cynthia MacAdams, courtesy Steven Kasher Gallery, New York. Both women were at the exhibition opening and gamely re-created this pose when someone in the crowd asked to take their picture by their picture.

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Cynthia MacAdams and Timothy Greenfield-Sanders at Steven Kasher Gallery. Photo by Patrick McMullan.


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Tim Mitchell at Modelinia, meanwhile, has written a nice piece about how the supermodel images came together:

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“We can’t tell you how many times we’ve thought, This screams Vanity Fair portrait! When it happens to us, the result usually involves makeshift gowns and shameless posing, but when it happens to great photographers like Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, something magical happens.

At a ’70s and ’80s fashion reunion hosted by hairstylist Harry King, the photographer spotted a special group of women and had the epiphany. A phone call to Vanity Fair and 10 supermodels later, Timothy had his shot.”

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Beverly Johnson, one of the supermodels in the exhibition, is also featured in The Black List: Volume Three. In a story published on Jan. 29, Timothy explained to Women’s Wear Daily that he’d been moved by her account of struggling to break into the modeling industry as an African-American. “We talked about the fashion industry and racism and what it meant to be the first black model on the cover of Vogue,” Timothy told WWD.

There’s more on “Supermodels of the 70s and 80s,” including some behind-the-scenes photos, over at the New York Times‘ T Magazine Blog.

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Click on the image to visit T Magazine Blog.

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