Director of National Portrait Gallery on the work of Nadav Kander

Tinie Tempah. Photo by Nadav Kander.

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Sandy Nairne, director of the National Portrait Gallery in London, wrote about Nadav Kander‘s work in a short essay appearing yesterday in the Guardian. Here’s an excerpt:

Kander prefers a certain distance from his subject, not seeking like the Edwardian modernist EO Hoppé or Annie Leibovitz to do extensive research, but opting for riskier interaction on the spot. “I like to create a void between myself and the person I’m photographing, where anything can happen… I remain quite empty, so that whatever happens at first happens with the camera trained on them.”

You can read the full text here.

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Elsewhere, It’s Nice That—a British Web and print publication for the creative industry—recently did an interview Nadav. An excerpt:

You seem to be shooting more and more music work—most recently for the Take That album, are you a big music fan?

When I was a kid we would hang out at each others houses and play records, and if someone had an impressive collection it would take up about 6 foot of space – a massive collection would be 2 sofas long and have taken 5 years at least to lovingly collect. It was in the days before music was churned out quickly for an insatiable public thirst. Nowadays most people would have twice this amount on an iPod. I loved savouring what I had and discovering every little nuance the vinyl had to offer.

Full interview here.

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Related: Opening next month: “Nadav Kander: Selected Portraits, 1999–2011”

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