Tobias Hutzler photographs the ultra-fast AM-RB 001, a street-legal collaboration between legendary carmaker Aston Martin and F1 engineer Adrian Newey, for The Wall Street Journal

Read the article here: “How Aston Martin and Red Bull Racing Reinvented Car Design”  

Brinson+Banks photograph surfer John John Florence for The Wall Street Journal

“The trailer for his movie, View From a Blue Moon, is absolutely stunning,” says Kendrick Brinson, “and made me immediately look up how much a flight to Hawaii is.”  

Photographer Matthew Rolston documents California’s beloved Pageant of the Masters for The Wall Street Journal

  As an 8-year-old, photographer and director-to-be Matthew Rolston was taken by his family to see the Pageant of the Masters, a somewhat offbeat and much-cherished theatrical event in Laguna Beach, California, in which set designers, makeup artists, and amateur actors give their all to faithfully re-create famous paintings in the flesh. The tableaux vivants—or […]

The Wall Street Journal explores Tobias Hutzler’s unique “Twist on Landscapes and Light”

Photo Journal, the photo blog of The Wall Street Journal, recently interviewed Tobias Hutzler about his striking approach to photographing the landscape, which incorporates natural and artificial light, long exposures, and the sensitivity and vision of a fine artist. “The landscape is a familiar image in photography and art, subject of the concrete and inspiration […]

Mummy dearest: The Wall Street Journal’s exclusive first look at Matthew Rolston’s startling new fine-art series, “Vanitas: The Palermo Portraits”

. Noted celebrity photographer Matthew Rolston, fresh off the success of “Talking Heads: The Vent Haven Portraits,” his book and exhibition featuring monumentally scaled portraits of vintage ventriloquist dummies, recently completed his latest fine-art project—and this new series is just as striking and unexpected. Rolston’s “Vanitas: The Palermo Portraits” comprises portraits of mummies from the […]

Farewell, Kodachrome

The Wall Street Journal has done an interesting story on the demise of Kodachrome, which, argues writer Richard B. Woodward, “has given honorable service for so long (since 1935 in movie cameras, since 1936 in 35mm still cameras) that its demise calls for a send-off more ceremonial than just a quote from the Paul Simon […]