Ad Age names “creatives you should know”

Advertising Age‘s recent “Agency Issue” spotlights “creatives you should know,” a list that spans eight agencies from around the globe. The mini-profiles of each person reveal just how prevalent digital is today and how much the definition of advertising has broadened. One agency’s promo for Mitsubishi involved inviting people to drive a real car through a real course—but virtually, from their keyboard.

Here’s the list. (Full article here.)

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Alexander Kalchev, Siavosh Zabeti, DDB, Paris
Ad Age excerpt: Both creatives trained as art directors at ad school but work as a cross-discipline team. “To be able to produce (ideas) in the best way possible, you need to be able to write and design the project,” said Mr. Zabeti.

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Staffan Lamm, Christoffer Persson, Fredrik Jansson, Forsman & Bodenfors
Ad Age excerpt: Between them, recent projects include a weather app for The Swedish Sea Rescue Society that visualizes dangerous waters for boaters, an online campaign for Volvo that showcases Scandinavian outdoor adventures, and Reebok’s “The Promise Keeper,” an app that engages runners’ social networks to keep them accountable for their missed workouts, created with Facebook Showroom team Adam Ulvegarde and Robert Lund. Also in the works is another campaign for Ikea, promoting the brand’s Sultan beds.

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JoonYong Park, Firstborn, New York City
Ad Age excerpt: I work to bring out people’s strengths and bring people into the process at the right time. No two projects are the same, so you have to constantly adapt to what’s happening each day. This is where it’s important to really know all the people on your team. Not everyone’s good at brainstorming and not everyone is a technical geek. So much here, at any successful company, depends on relationships and on working together.

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Daniel Wahlgren, Magnus Andersson, Jung von Matt Stockholm
Ad Age excerpt: …While many of the jobs they do are technology-heavy, they’re “not about technology,” said Mr. Wahlgren. “They are about engaging people. To do that you need insights and ideas based on the insights. We don’t think tech in itself is that cool.”

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Ginny Golden, AKQA, Washington, D.C.
Ad Age excerpt: Ms. Golden joined AKQA’s Washington office in 1997 after four years as a visual designer, and says her design training still plays a role in her creative process. “I’ll devote an entire day to making sure everyone on the team understands who we’re talking to. Then I’ll ask them to think about the problem and return with inspiration — a video, a photo, whatever. I find a common pitfall for many creatives is concentrating on tactics too early. If it’s a good idea, it’s based on a strategic insight and it can take on many forms and manifestations.

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Guga Ketzer, Loducca, Sao Paulo
Ad Age excerpt: “When I started, many people wanted to work outside of Brazil. Nowadays I am getting used to receiving a huge contingent of emails from people wanting to work here. I want to work on global projects more and more without having to leave the country I was born in and love. I think we’re prepared for this.”

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Matthew Woodhams-Roberts, Dave Horton, 180 L.A.
Ad Age excerpt: Mr. Horton: “The fact that the whole industry is in a state of flux right now is really exciting.”

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Ciel Hunter, Creators Project
Ad Age excerpt: The Project has spanned a series of global parties and music shows, art installations, panel discussions, a web content channel and more, and has initiated collaborations with and showcased the works of a who’s who of established and next-generation artists. … “I provide overall direction on the content, the artworks, and the artists, and specifically work very closely on the curation of both artists and artworks,” Ms. Hunter said. 

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