This week’s highlights from other photo blogs

I’ve been thinking about the overabundance of blogs and online magazines and wondering if print is the only way to stand out anymore. And I’m not the only who’s been pondering this, apparently. The Magculture.com blog excerpted this observation by Bec Brown, editor of the online art/design magazine Blanket:

“‘Starting out online was financially easier and I was able to reach a wider, international audience, but it has become more difficult to compete online with so many other blogs and websites.”

Which drew the following comment from a reader: “With the business (audience, advertising) shifting to digital media will paper publishing become a field for real amateurs (in its noble meaning)? Fast and interactive media vs slow and collectable media?”

Link: http://magculture.com/blog/?p=11303

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Noting that “applications to the Orange County High School of the Arts, the alma mater of Glee star Matthew Morrison, have been soaring,” the Los Angeles TimesFramework blog posted a photo essay by LA Times shooter Jay L. Clendenin on the seniors at the school performing their season finale.

Link: http://framework.latimes.com/2011/06/24/glee-effect-pictures/

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British magazine Professional Photographer interviewed Lorraine Candy, the editor of Elle U.K. about the magazine’s approach to photography and what she seeks in prospective Elle photo contributors. An excerpt:

“I think the lighting and emotional feel of a photographer’s book is the most important thing. I’m looking for something unusual; someone with a slightly different take on things. Photography in print can convey a sense of emotion. There are a lot of good technical photographers out there, but you can’t get anything out of them.”

Link: http://www.professionalphotographer.co.uk/Frontline/Editors/Lorraine-Candy-Editor-ELLE-UK-magazine

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Another Los Angeles Times blog, All the Rage, reports that Smashbox Studios is hosting an exhibition of work by photo assistants. “The idea behind the show is to introduce emerging photographers to top working photographers, photo representatives and  producers.”

Link: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/alltherage/2011/06/up-and-comers-smashbox-studios-hosts-the-annual-la-photo-assistants-show.html

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Cover Junkie posted the latest in its “Great Art Directors About Their Favorite Covers” series, which asks creatives what covers (from any time in publishing history) they wish they’d designed. This week, it was Eric Capossela, design director at Atlanta magazine. Among his picks was the above July 1966 Esquire cover designed by George Lois.

“This list wouldn’t be complete without the inclusion of Mr. George Lois,” writes Capossela. “This DiMaggio cover carries a certain sadness, elegance, AND the grandeur of Yankee Stadium. And that iconic swing!”

Link: http://www.coverjunkie.com/blog/coverjunkie-eric-capossela/15/6505

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La Lettre de la Photographie spotlighted photos of Mexico by Larry Cwik. Explains Cwik, “The work in this series results from a cumulative total of six months spent photographing for this project in Mexico, visiting annually since 1983, to a different large city each year, and walking an estimated 900 miles to date through the streets of Mexican cities, looking for images.” He adds, “Andre Breton, a founder of surrealism, said that Mexico is ‘the surrealist place par excellence,’ and I agree.”

Link: http://lalettredelaphotographie.com/entries/the-mexico-of-larry-cwik

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PDNonline posted an article on how best to stay in touch after a portfolio review that included a few other interesting portfolio-review nuggets, like this…

Too often, photographers will attend reviews with just one body of work and then show up with the same set of images. Christopher Rauschenberg, co-curator of Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, Oregon (and co-founder of Photolucida), recommends photographers bring at least two or three different series for review. “We all say it, but not everyone listens,” says Rauschenberg. By bringing more than one project to show, “you minimize the chances of having work that someone won’t care anything about or has no feeling for.”

…and this, from curator Anne Wilkes Tucker of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

“During the review I want to see between 20 to 30 pieces max. I also prefer an artist not go on and on about the work before I see it. Don’t tell me who has bought the work and where it was shown. Either the work will speak for itself or it won’t.”

Link: http://www.pdnonline.com/pdn/features/Benefiting-from-Port-3091.shtml

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British newspaper The Telegraph illustrated its “Photography Sites of the Week” with the above pair of images by Jocelyn Allen, whose work was on view all last month as part of the Guernsey Photography Festival.

Link: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/photography/6515582/Photography-sites-of-the-week.html

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We Can Shoot Too was taken with Kevin Scanlon’s photos and video of people living off the grid in Southern California’s high desert, and the county’s crackdown on them. The images accompanied a piece in the LA Weekly.

Link: http://wecanshoottoo.blogspot.com/2011/06/la-countys-war-on-desert-rats.html

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And AnOther magazine’s Kasia Bobula writes of finding a 1966 copy of Photography Annual containing an interview with Irving Penn. Among the quotes she posted from the “brutally honest yet very educational interview” is this one on commercial photography:

“The ideal commercial photograph is one that is highly sensual. It is however a controlled and used sensuality. (…) As a matter of fact, advertising clients of successful companies seem to value the sensual picture more than editors of magazines do, because they know that is a way to get at buying the public.”

Link: http://www.anothermag.com/reader/view/4001/IRVING_PENN_IN_QUOTES

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