A photo competition that raises “Hope for a Healthy World”

PDN is one of the major supporters of a photo competition aimed at raising awareness of global health issues, and with the entry deadline coming up, our friends at the magazine have asked us to help them spread the word. The BD Hope for a Healthy World Photo Competition seeks photos on the theme of global health, specifically ones that “showcase efforts directed at fighting disease and addressing public health issues. Your submissions should showcase efforts directed at fighting disease and addressing public health issues. Photos should document human suffering and the health care response to the following topics: HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, measles, tetanus, diabetes, cervical cancer, infant and maternal mortality, chronic and infectious diseases. Also of interest are health issues surrounding disaster relief, healthcare worker safety, healthcare access, vaccination and diagnostics research, infection control and Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAI’s).” (More on the contest’s rules here.)

The deadline to enter is February 29, and there is no entry fee. As for the judges, they are all top-notch: David Griffin, visuals editor of The Washington Post; Jon Jones, photo editor of the U.K.’s Sunday Times Magazine; Laara Matsen, photo editor of D2 magazine; Kira Pollack, director of photography at Time; and Marcel Saba, director of Redux Pictures.

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Some of last year’s winners…

Photo by Mary F. Calvert, winner in the category of Best Global Health Story, Professional. "Polio victim Abubakar, 6, crawls next to the footprint of his mother at the family home in Kano. The photo is part of a series that brings attention to a highly infectious virus that cripples children it does not kill."

Photo by Rodrigo Alfaro, who won for Best Global Health Story, Amateur. "A woman with her sick child waited overnight for a ride home from the hospital. Alfaro’s photo essay focuses on unsafe childbirth practices in Paraguay, responsible for a high rate of deaths in newborns and mothers."

Photo by Carlos Cazalis, who won for Best Global Health Image, Professional. "A Haitian woman being checked for cholera at a field hospital near Port-au-Prince. Cazalis’ photos document Haiti’s struggles, including its battle with cholera, a waterborne disease that spreads through the water system and rivers."

Photo by Gerardo Sabado, who won for Best Global Health Image, Amateur. "Patients with multiple drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) in a hospital’s isolation ward in Manila. Sabado’s work highlights a strain of TB where first-line drugs used to treat patients are ineffective."

Photo by Stefano de Luigi, who won for Best Global Health Multimedia, Professional. "A child in India regains her sight after a corneal transplant. Stefano de Luigi’s multimedia emphasizes the importance of education, support and prevention (when possible) for blind people in developing countries."

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BD is a medical technology company that “dedicated to improving people’s health throughout the world.” In addition to PDN, LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph is a supporter of the BD Hope for a Healthy World Photo Competition. If your work is selected, it will become part of a traveling photo exhibition sponsored by BD that will open at LOOK3 in Charlottesville, Virginia, June 7 to 9. The winning work will also be part of a gallery hosted at PDNonline.com and will be represented in this year’s PDN Photo Annual, which is the June issue. (See more of last year’s winners here.)

There are cash and other prizes, too:

  • Best Global Health Story:
    $5,000 Cash
  • Best Global Health Image:
    $2,500 Cash
  • Best Global Health Multimedia:
    $2,500 Cash

All Winners Will Receive:

  • PhotoServe Portfolio ($860 value)
  • 1 year subscription to PDN
  • 2012 PDN PhotoPlus Expo Gold Expo Pass
  • All-access Big Love Pass to the 2012 LOOK3 Festival

Find out more at bdphotocompetition.com. And if you’re interested in working with BD, take note: They’re open to hearing from photographers. More on that here.

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