“The Black List: Volume Three” premieres

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The Black List: Volume Three, the latest installment in Timothy Greenfield-Sanders and Elvis Mitchell’s award-winning The Black List Project, premieres this month in a variety of forms and venues. Last night, Bill Stockland, Stockland Martel photo agent Michelle Sack, and photographer Kwaku Alston attended a screening of The Black List: Volume Three documentary at the Paley Center for Media in Los Angeles. Bill called me this morning to tell me about the event:

“Timothy does something so simple—so deceptively simple—both in his photography and now in his direction. Some people, particularly photographers, look at him and think he’s doing the same thing over and over, but he’s really letting people speak for themselves. He doesn’t add any artifice,” said Bill.

At the screening last night, “I just sit there transfixed,” Bill said. “It’s people giving a voice to their own history. I wanted to hear more. And I want to see him do more lists of more kinds of people—everybody deserves to have a voice.”

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The Black List: Volume Three documentary will make it broadcast debut on HBO on February 8th at 8:30 PM ET. Among the people featured are Whoopi Goldberg; singer John Legend; Dr. Michael Lomax, president and CEO of the United Negro College Fund; actor Hill Harper; model and actress Beverly Johnson; Lee Daniels, who directed the movie Precious; and actress LaTanya Richardson. From HBO’s description of the film:

“Following the same format as The Black List: Volume One and Volume Two, this month’s documentary focuses on over a dozen prominent African Americans as they speak their minds about a wide range of influences and experiences in this intimate series of first-person video portraits. Introduced via simple IDs, the interviewees speak directly into the camera and share their insights into what it was like growing up black in America, how their backgrounds shaped their philosophies, and what they feel about a society where new opportunities abound, but discrimination still exists.”

Tomorrow, the exhibition “The Black List Project” opens at the Paley Center for Media in New York, where it will be on view through May 1. The Paley Center in Los Angeles is also hosting the exhibition, which opened there on January 29 and will be on display through April 4. More info on both shows here.

At the New York opening tomorrow, there will be a screening of the film at 6:30, and Timothy will be there, along with Dr. Michael L. Lomax; Elvis Mitchell; and Faye Wattleton, cofounder/president, the Center for the Advancement of Women. Tickets for the screening are $15; details here.

Here’s an excerpt from Whoopi’s interview:

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One Comment

  1. G. Franklin
    Posted 02/04/2010 at 9:30 pm | Permalink

    Timothy Greenfield-Sanders’ ongoing saga of “Being Black in America” leads me to agree with Paul Farhi’s (Washington Post) recent critique of “The Blind Side” on the Chris Matthews-Hardball show – i.e. “that the black character is basically a prop to make the white people feel better about themselves.” Surely this would have been far more monumental and rewarding through an African-American filmmaker and/or photographer’s lens. But of course, that African-American filmmaker and/or photographer must be given the opportunity to produce such. Since this is Stockland Martel’s blog, I would welcome you to open your doors to more African-American artists other than the consequential “one” that you presently represent. There still exists such a lack of diversity in the industry.


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